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of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
" special investigation, the truth about benghazi. for nearly a year, america has been searching for answers about the deadly attacks that took the lives of four americans, including ambassador christopher stevens, information officer sean smith and two former navy s.e.a.l.s. that search for answers could not be any more relevant than tonight, as u.s. embassies and consulates around the world are closed or on high alert. prevents another attack means getting to the truth of what happened there. we go back to benghazi of where it all began to investigate why all the attacks happened. plus, john king gets to the bottom of the talking points and the evolving story coming out of washington in the days and weeks after the attacks. to presidential politics lead to a coverup? and what did the families of the four lost americans want most? you'll hear from them directly. but first, we go back to the hours before the attack. september 11. in america, a day of solemn remembrance. in 2012, a day of violence in the middle east. demonstrators storm the u.s. embassy in cairo, angry over a low-rent film ma
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
is america's money. >> good morning, topping america's money, the price at the much just keeping on dropping. gas prices have slipped 7-cents in one week, now down to $3.56 a gallon. isle refineries have been keeping output high. will apple take a bite out of blackberry? potential buyers may be rival apple or google if only to get their hands on that technology. and facebook c.o.o. is getting her hands on a huge chunk of cash. she sold a 5% block of her facebook staff. said to be worth $400 million. and move other james patterson, james has knocked them off the highest paid list. even bypassing other literary giants like danielle steel and steven king that's america's money. >> "i'm terry mcauliffe, candidate for governor, and i sponsored this ad." it's been called "cuccinelli's witch hunt" "designed to intimidate and suppress" ken cuccinelli used taxpayer funds to investigate a uva professor whose research on climate chge cuccinelli opposed. cuccinelli, a climate change denier, forced the university to spend over half a million dollars defending itself against it's own attorney general. ken
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
're on day 25 of filner watch. >>> and honoring america's heroes. first responders front and center. >> there is no second chance in if you're late, it will matter. >> country music superstar tim mcgraw and a new program to empower our firefighters and emts. >> share these stories with you. >> mcgraw joins me live, straight ahead. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. no flight data recorders, no communications and no answers. the big question remains this morning, why did a u.p.s. cargo jet crash just before landing in alabama? right now more than 24 hours after the crash, the cockpit and voice recorders have yet to be recovered. both remain inside the still smoldering wreckage. now, the answers may be in those recorde recorders, since there was no communication from the pilots to air traffic control just before the crash and the only clues available are from witnesses. >> when i got up, it just, i just heard like a boom, boom. and i didn't know what it was. i was just staring out the window and i looked
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
. and so, after nine years of separation an arrival gate in america. pure joy. >> hi, daddy. christie maynard who heard their story stepped in to help the family. >> very pretty. >> reporter: she took her on a shopping trip on her first day in america. >> it is so cool. >> yeah, let's go. it is so overwhelming, it makes me feel complete. >> reporter: and she already has a big american dream. >> i want to be a doctor, like for women who is pregnant, and small kids. >> reporter: ast steory that red us, sometimes god smiles and those who lived through dark days in africa can find light in a country founded on hope. bob woodruff, abc news, new york. >> what a great way. >> love that story. >> what a great we to end our newscast. the family reunited after nine years. boy do they have stories to tell each other. >> what a wonderful young woman she is. >> she will be a doctor. >> bet you she will. >> i can't wait to see it happen. good for them. >> see you in a little bit. ♪ >>> this the new york city police department now has to be part of the solution because the judge has agreed with us
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
reporters discuss their book "whitey bulger: america's most wanted gangster and the man hunt that brought him to justice." , the trialgan -- began june 12, 2013. [applause] >> thank you for coming out on such a beautiful day. we don't get a lot of those here. i'm with the chicago tribune, write a business column with kevin and shelly murphy of the boston globe who are here not to do scouting on the chicago black hawks. [laughter] but to talk about their new book on whitey bulger, the boston mobster caught on the lamb after, what, 16 years, and first of all, let's get -- you guys have been boston journalists for quite a long time at this point. >> somebody said between us it's, like, what, 16 years? yeah, we've been chasing him combined total for 25 -- i mean, 25 each, so 50 between us. >> wow. i was reminded in the beginning, when i was a kid, my father was taking a friend of mine to go see butch cassidy and the sun dance kid. he said, you know, remember, whatever the movie makes of them, they are the bad guys, and the other thing that it reminded me of was the old line from mel brooke in
're black or white, latino, asian america or native american. it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people -- >> the actual anniversary is wednesday, that is when president obama will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial along with former president bill clinton and jimmy carter. close tore home, hundreds of people marched in san jose, they walked about a mile to the county building shouting, slogans and drumming. there was one woman who marched in washington 50 years ago and sat in her view there has been significant progress that more needs to be done. still ahead this morning what san francisco has to do to live up to the i have a dream speech. >>> on the action san francisco may take against nevada for dumping mentally ill patients in california. surfers and swimmers banned because of a shark. >> the weather department much more tranquil we're looking for a pleasant area once we dispense look at the nation's midsection. they're heating up and they're cooling down, good forecast for you after a break. ,,,, bay area headlines... stins beach is re-opening t
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
of america's most original and influential... depp: the sixties begin with a shot. [ gunshot ] the civil rights movement intensifies. the war in vietnam gets bigger and bldier. man: president johnson, meanwhile, let it be known that the fbi is closely watching all anti-war activity. depp: the youth movement catches fire, making everyone over 30 a cultural enemy. the days of ricky nelson and "leave it to beaver" are over. i have nothing against kissing. but these friends of yours, penny, they want to kiss you all night. depp: the establishment resists, but a genuine counter-culture is growing. for some, psychedelics like lsd open the doors of perception. the doors: ♪ the gate is straight ♪ deep and wide, break on through ♪ depp: a massive cultural earthquake is splitting the country wide open. and out of the crack steps a band called the doors. man: name? robby krieger. age? 22 years old. occupation? guitar. name? john densmore. age? 23. occupation? percussionist. name? raymond daniel manzarek. age? born 2/12/39. occupation? musician, organist. name? uh, jim. occupation? um... depp:
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
issues. >> this morning on "world news now" -- rich relief. the world meets america's newest millionaire. we have new details about who is taking home one of the jack pots from new jersey. also ahead. >> my main goal for this whole project is to find the real paul. >> the decade old mystery of a missing baby. why this man believed that little boy was him. in an abc news exclusive, barbara walters sits down with the man in the middle of the heartbreaking mix-up. >> then forget about laying on the beach. how about hovering high above it. the newest vacation sensation. it's friday, august 9th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> tgif. can i get a high five. >> yes. >> we feel brown today. i feel like we work for ups or something. >> just need our patches. couple of things to deliver. >> boxes. >> couple boxes. it is friday. perfect way to start friday. starting with a feel good story. >> let's get to it. feel belt irtter if it was me. learning details about one of the winning powerball tick tets. >> but by a group of vehicle workers an
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
. >> is it likely? >> i don't know the answer to that unfortunately because law enforcement management in america at the federal level is a disaster. >> do you agree with that, mitch? that's a pretty big statement. >> those are strong words for somebody who used to be a u.s. attorney. he outranks me. i'm not going to try to take that one out. >> you must be right. possible certainly isn't a lot of support for the federal prosecutions that we have in this country. >> i have great respect for the agents and the u.s. attorneys around the country who do a very difficult job. i was a u.s. attorney, i was an independent counsel. i've had a lot of experience. but i'm going to tell you something, federal government has gotten too big, federal law enforcement agencies have gotten too big. they are manageable. nobody know what is they're doing. look at the latest story about how the dea is providing information to the nsa interc t intercepts and are being told to lie to federal judges about it. you cannot have law enforcement functioning where they are told it's okay to lie to a federal judge about how a
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
-man, captain america and batman work for sundland window cleaning. the company is donating time and the costumes. wearing the mask means you have to think quick. kids have a lot of questions. >> who is the easiest guy to take down? >> hmm, the joker. >> the joker. >> reporter: when you are chronically ill it forces you grow up. the job of healing and recovery can be pretty intense when confined in a hospital for weeks even months. so a superhero distraction like this reminds kids that, well, they're just kids. >> there is research done on laugher and how it helps the body heal. watching the kids out here down and talking with the superheroes, i think that's exactly what was going on. >> reporter: little abby can't help but feel there is nothing she can't d i love to see her smile. >> abby didn't like that mom was facing the camera. mom, mom. >> therapeutic for kids and parents. >> yeah. >> that's wonderful. >>> we want to tell you, next week, national dog day monday. we want to help you show off your best friend. theut p it should be a lot of fun. e-mail us at wnnfans.com. inclu
new plans to overhaul america's mortgage system today. he's going to propose shutting down government-backed lenders fannie mae and freddie mac, plus, he wants to boost the number of 30-year mortgages in this market hoping it will make loans more accessible to more people so they can fulfill the american dream. carl cameron has more from washington. so a lot of proposals, carl. we're not sure exactly what will become of them, but what is the president proposing today in. >> reporter: well, he wants to strengthen the housing market by making 30-year mortgages more available, and one of the ways would be to do away with fannie mae and freddie mac and institute more capital into mortgage lending. shaun donovan is the president's hud secretary, the secretary of housing and urban development. he's how he put it this morning. >> we also have to make sure we never go back to a system that takes trillions of dollars in housing wealth away from families that can crash the spire world economy. so -- the entire world economy. so a big focus is how do we build a safe, stable housing finance syste
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
turned down opportunities in the land down under to play america's pastime in the sooner state. 9,000 miles away. >> and it was a choice that he'd made when he was about 15 that that's what he wanted to do. >> reporter: jones, the oldest of the three suspects, is being held on a $1 million bond. luna, who is believed to have fired the gun, and edwards who prosecutors say laughed during his arrest, will be tried as adults. >> the family in australia, they're hurting. i'm hurting the same way. i don't cry on the outside. i'm crying right here from the heart right now. >> as lane's family prepares to bring him home his death has touched a nerve worldwide. the former australia deputy prime minister is even calls on tourists to boycott the u.s. to send a message about gun control. charlie, gayle? >> michelle miller, thank you. >>> a potential 2016 presidential candidate is defending himself this morning over his citizenship. jan crawford is outside the canadian embassy in washington. jan, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. good morning, gayle. tex
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
notorious criminals. the fbi's ten most wanted list, has chronicled america's infamous from james earl ray to tud bundy and the centennial bomber. accused murderers, drug traffickers and child parnographers. >> most of these folks have commit more than one very serious crime, rapes and murders, these are very dangerous people. >> ron hoska, who runs the ten most wanted program, is responsible for finding these people. >> 500 criminals have made the list in his 63-year history and 470 cases have been cleared. >> not all those are by arrest. some are in custody, some turned up dead, but 94% clearance rate is a tremendously successful program. but it's the other 6% that keep him and his agents up at night. >> a wiley fugitive who drops under the horizon can present a significant challenge to us. >> and even amid the top ten list of criminality, the story of one wiley fugitive stands out. you might know him and not even realize it. he could live across town, down the block, or maybe even closer. and if you know where to find him, the fbi could make it worth your while. this fugitive's catch me
. thank you and god bless america. >> i think we go we go inside ? >> we have a signing station set in the air conditioning. >> it's in air conditioning. >> those of us in wool are looking forward to the air conditioning. >> you do that. you're the boss. i'm just the passenger. college is nice, isn't it? >> we will take a moment and get ourselves oriented. we are leaving downtown gettysburg. the train will be moving in a westerly direction. >> does this train go parallel to the route that he came down or hill came down? i think so. you may want to get on and explain that at some point or have bill do it. you do have a narration? you may want to have somebody actually do the narration if that makes sense. >> it was just over that hill where the fighting took place very early in the morning july 1, 1863. >> i think either you or bill should give the narration. bill knows vastly more about the details than i do. but it's your train. i will say something general. >> walk through the park. hi, how are you? good. aren't you wa-good. aren't you warm? >> very warm, sir. >> saw you on bill o
driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> fox news >>> fox news alert, it is over. hannah anderson is safe, and james lee dimaggio the man accused of snatching her is shot dead by an fbi sniper. jonathan gilliam is in the studio with me as we get calls from the family and others throughout the west coast, and jonathan here in new york with me. now, you were saying that the team is the same team that took down the boston marathoner, or involved in the boston marathon investigation and sounds like one shooter. what do you think? describe the scene in idaho as you perceive it? >> from what we know a helicopter out there and spotters in the helicopter, and snipers as well, but they weren't that far in the woods so maybe they were guiding a team in or maybe a shot from the hill, and they had the capabilities of doing both. >> they had the capability of taking him out or from the chopper, but you think that the shots came from the ground? >> i don't know, g
'll be leaving my job and heading back to congress. >> his head band say good tell, he's got america on his mind, literally. >>> but first for you this morning, breaking news, there is chaos in egypt, deadly clashes overnight between government security forces and supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. these clashes have left 15 dead, more than 200 injured and those numbers are expected to rise. cnn is covering this story like no other network can, with live team coverage. first let's go to arwa damon, live in the streets of cairo, joining us by phone. arwa, can you hear us? if so, what's the latest? >> reporter: well these clashes are really spreading throughout the entire capital. we were outside around an hour ago when we last talk, the main sit-in site, watching pro-morsi demonstrators, crowds using a bus for cover, trying to move forward on an overpass to join those demonstrators that are at the main sit-in site. now we're in another part of cairo where we saw tear gassing, what sounded like gunshots. this is another area where there is a fairly large crowd of pro-morsi demonstrators
this. that is not the way you do things in the united states of america. you have this tremendous natural inclination to think of all the reasons why you can't do it, you have to do it. that is where we were. >> after the swearing-in, in the first few hours or days were there any offices or persons in authority, that this was in fact a done deal? >> i don't -- i think there were some people who came to the capital and next morning who had not seen this on tv, is lee curtis peer? she is one, who showed up for work the next morning and didn't know this had happened and yet the world had turned upside down. >> the perception was the governor -- >> very new short-term receptionist in governor blanton's front office and worked for governor alexander and fortress the government for 30 plus years. >> on that question, one, based on bill koch's advice, i asked the new cabinet members to take their offices that make no decisions between the swearing-in on wednesday and saturday and those decisions could not be challenged later by anybody so we tried to minimize that but the question you as
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) >>> you can join the "news nation" on twitter. find us at our twitter page @newsnation. meanwhile, strikes from fast food restaurants across the nation tops our story today. the protesters picked up steam this week. workers are growing louder for higher wages and the right to form a union. the national restaurant association which represents many of the restaurants where workers are protesting claims they operate on very thin profit margins and raising wages could hamper their ability to hire. >> dozens of people exchanged vous at midnight as same-sex marriage became legal in those states. couples in rhode island began tying the knot this morning. >>> and george zimmerman resurfaces again, this time texas dash cam video shows an
. >> is marijuana harmful or helpful? cnn's dr. sanjay gupta cuts through the smoke on america's green rush and journeys around the world to uncover the highs and lows of weed. tomorrow night, 8:00 eastern. >>> next, major flooding across a big portion of the united states. people in 12 states are in danger of high water right now. i'll show you a wide area of the south that's already been hit and is back in the threat zone again. begins with arthritis pain... and a choice. take up to 6 tylenol in a day or just 2 aleve for all day relief. all aboard. ♪ all aboard. hi, hi, i'm sherri. and i'm going to show sherri how collecting box tops for education earns cash for our school by shopping at walmart. come on. sherri, look at all these products that you can buy for your family with box tops. and look, four box tops in one box. that's awesome! more cash for our school. only at walmart you get 4 box tops on over 100 items. karissa i got it and you only had to tell me four times. find 4 box tops on your family favorites like general mills cereals and nature valley granola bars backed by our low
by 3.4%. it was hit by natural catastrophes, bad weather essentially, in north america. but also in europe. net profit missing expectations for the second quarter, and companies also pretty cautious about its outlook. last but not least, i want to show you what is happening in the currency space. sterling dollar at a two-month high, sitting at 155.78. getting closer and closer to that 156 level. this is on the back of better -- much stronger than expected retail sales for the month of july. certainly benefitting from that heat wave we have been seeing in the uk. euro dollar pretty resilient at 132.82, back below the 133 level. and dollar yen seeing a little bit of softness at 98.07. this is because the finance minister in japan pretty much quashed hopes of that cut in the corporate tax rate and this is what the markets had been hoping for. so we are seeing some yen strength. and on the back of that, we are seeing declines, pretty big ones, actually, in the nikkei 225. back over to you guys. >> thanks very much, carolin. becky, are you still looking? >> looking for some of these.
. and if they dorvisor no, that's important to america's safety and security so what is that this one action you take at that point? >> first i would like to see a source with training and education. we have put together office of training and workforce engagement a very robust, ethics and integrity training program. and also a training program for entire workforce. because that's a we get to an efficient workforce in future, high-performance workforce. we have put together a very substantial required training that all tsos have to go through. >> how do you train -- i'm baffled. how to train one to know to call their supervisor and tell him i'm not going to be a work or i may be late? >> it is commonsense. and i would tell you that we have ethics training. we have integrity training. we have situational training on videos for our people. we're trying to train a workforce of about 47,000 screeners, and they have to do the job and have to be trained. they get in on an annual basis. we distrusted it would but messages. i want to you on the issue of tardiness, you're right. i'm not going to disagree with
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desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
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